College Baseball Info-Everything You Need To Know (2022)

College Baseball Recruiting Info & Scholarship Rules/Physical & Academic Requirements

Review all Criteria/Rules at NCAA.org

NCAA.com contains college athletic teams by division.

NJCAA.org - Junior college website (Juco)

NJCAAregion3.org - DIII NY Junior College league/divisions (Only DI in NY are two in NYC)(MCC is DII; FLCC,NCCC,all others are DIII)

SUNYAC (4yr NY SUNY League-Brockport/Oswego/Fredonia/Cortland)

Empire8 (regional Private 4yr League-Fisher/Ithaca)

Liberty League (regional Private 4yr League-RIT/UofR)

College Baseball Matrix - All these factors have to be considered/understood

There are 1654 Colleges that offer Varsity baseball

Many large 4yr Colleges offer Club level baseball (lower level and less stressful-but competitive with travel to other colleges)

FIRST: Grades get you into the school not baseball!

You must be accepted before you can even play; even if recruited hard.

Only 12% of all High School Varsity baseball players will play college baseball.

When a player feels mature and strong enough, he should make a skills video, post it to YouTube, and forward a link in tailored interest emails to college coaches (at Schools he wants to attend-not all colleges). Then attend reputible showcase events that have college coaches present (from schools you are interested in) and college prospect camps at the colleges you are interested in. Players need to have a narrow list of colleges of interest to focus on; don't just attend everything and mass mail and hope for the best. Communicate as best you can to get a coach's attention-and include links to your online skills video and info. Ask them if they will be at certain events and go where they will be. Don't send coaches video cds.

Players and their family should discuss how far from home is comfortable for the player to attend college. Players need to keep in mind that there are hundreds of colleges at all levels that you have never heard of that are located from Upper MidWest/Lower MidWest over to Florida and Mid Atlantic to Northeast. Many have very competitive baseball and great academics. Take time to research based on your distance from home criteria. Playing college baseball in NYS is very limited compared to the universe of colleges east of the Mississippi.

In General: Unless your a pitcher throwing 88+ or a player hitting a dozen home runs in Varsity, don't plan on College coaches "finding" you without you doing the work to get them to "notice you". You need to understand the baseball landscape outside of Rochester, by playing in higher level talent tournaments outside of Rochester and attend a few showcases and college camps to see the larger talent pool that college coaches see. This gives the player perspective on how his skills compare to the wider talent pool of players looking to play in college and helps your son get motivated to push themselves on skill development (professional instruction) and weight room activity. The success of school and youth teams matters much less than the experiences that the Varsity or Travel team participated in; sectionals performance or high level tournament experience (experience playing under pressure). This helps a college coach believe that your son knows what he is getting himself into with college ball expectations of "hard work" - willing to go through the "grind" of it all (weight room everyday).

College coaches focus on SIZE, FOOT SPEED, THROWING VELOCITY, BAT SPEED, and BALL EXIT SPEED - Skill and trave/HS stats are secondary to these.

College Ball at all levels is much faster and more powerfulin all respects than HS Varsity. HS Players HAVE TO be willing to work on Strength and Conditioning from 15u on. All college teams spend as much time in the weight room as on the field.


Getting "recruited" comes in different degrees of interest from the college coach down to walkon - don't plan on an Athleticscholarship as most players get more from Academic scholarships -DIIINCAA and DIII NJCAA don't have athletic scholarships, butthey might adjust standard academic/meritscholarshipsup a little..maybe; but coaches can't talk to admissions. Baseball scholarships are small and limited and not guaranteed for all four years - FULL RIDES DON'T HAPPEN. Scholarships apply to Tuition, not Room and Board.

All new position players have to prove themselves in college Fall Ball and some are cut in Fall or may not play in Spring and are cut later (scholarship or no scholaship). Many 4-yr schools have players coming in as Junior transfers along with HS recruits. Lots of competition for limited spots.

Many schools carry 35 to 40 kids and many will never see game time.

Figure out a dozen schools that you would like to attend going into Junior Year and start to narrow it down. Visit the schools and ask for a meeting with the baseball coaches. Very few players are "RECRUITED" hard....those that are, aretypically strong Pitchers. College coaches focus on pitching first.

College coaches research a recruit's credibility by searching social media for any negative, inappropriate, or distasteful postings and commentary. They may exclude you for these things before you ever know they are/were interested in your talent.

Recruiting Literature: be aware that if your son creates a recruiting profile at an online site like NCSA or BeRecruited, or any other, they will start to receive numerous amounts of mail and email about corporate showcases and college coach personalized letters inviting them to that college's prospect camps/showcases. Take note that these are "mass" mailings that go out to hundreds, and sometimes thousands of players at the same time and should only be looked at as information. Those mailingsDO NOT mean your son is being recruited by that college. Coaches/Schools/Showcase Orgs pay for these mailing lists. Don't travel hundreds or a thousand miles to a college camp just because of those mass distribution letters. Also, Colleges hold prospect camps mainly as fundraisers; thoughthey do have a purpose if you already are interested in that school, or you want to attend a couple just to get used to the pressure ofshowcase events. LET that coach know you are interested in that school. The online profiles are ok and should be honest and link to a skills video posted to Youtube. You do need those profiles so a coach, that does become interested in you, can look up info and find your online skills video, once they specifically become interested in you or are reviewing you.

Understand Recruiting: If a coach is not directly initiating contact with you and interacting with you one on one, you are not being recruited....You'll know you are being recruited when the coach specifically says he wants you to play for him and offers athletic scholorship money (if applicable).

Parents:College coaches only want to talk to your son (start to finish); do not perform the work your son should be doing himself. Don't contact college coaches for your son or about your son while recruiting or while he's on a college roster. It's fine to greet the coach and introduce yourselves; but remember, coaches are looking for maturity in a player. NEVER initiate discussion with a coach about playing time or positions, etc. Also, do not brag about your son to a coach....they judge for themselves about whether your son can play at the college level using their own eyes, measurables info, and discussions with credentialed, trustworthy references (former collegiate/professional players and coaches) that know your son.

Recruiting Column: How college coaches evaluate parents http://on.rocne.ws/2yW269R via @DandC

BOTTOM LINE IS A PLAYER SHOULD PLAY FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME AND CHALLENGE AND UNDERSTAND THE REALITY OF PLAYING COLLEGE BALL.....THEREFORE, YOU WANT TO BE AT A SCHOOL YOU LIKE IN CASE BASEBALL DOESN'T WORK OUT.

Adjust the dates below to the current year as needed.

NCAA LevelSchools Offering BaseballScholarships
D129811.7 (25% MIN)
D22599 (25% MIN)
D33740
NAIA21212
JUCO D118424
JUCO D212924
JUCO D31980

D1 Baseball

Recruiting TacticAs a SophomoreAs a JuniorAs a Senior
Recruiting Material*You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.*You can begin to receive recruiting material and information from the coach on September 1st.*You can receive material and information from the coach.
Telephone Calls*You can call the coach at your own expense.
** Coach cannot call you.
*You can call the coach at your own expense.
**You can receive one per week starting Sept 1st of your Junior year (new).
***Telephone calls are unlimited during contact periods.
*You can call the coach at your own expense.
**Coach can call you once per week starting July 1st.
***Telephone calls are unlimited during contact periods.
Off-Campus Contact*Not Permitted*Allowed Sept 1st (new) after your Junior year.*Allowed but no more than 3 times.
Official Visits*Not Permitted*Not Permitted*You can start official visits on the opening day of your classes.
**You get one per college and a maximum of 5 visits to D1 and unlimited to D2, D3 and NAIA schools.
Unofficial Visits*Unlimited*Unlimited*Unlimited

D1 Baseball Calender

08-01-14 thru 08-31-14Contact Period
09-01-14 thru 09-11-14Quiet Period
09-12-14 thru 11-09-14Contact Period
11-10-14 thru 11-13-14Dead Period
11-14-14 thru 02-28-15Quiet Period *with the following exception (i)
(i) 01-02-15 thru 01-06-15Dead Period
03-01-15 thru 07-31-15Contact Period *with the following exception (i)
(i) 04-13-15 thru 04-16-15Dead Period

D2 Baseball

Recruiting TacticAs a SophomoreAs a JuniorAs a Senior
Recruiting Material*You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.*You can begin to receive recruiting material and information from the coach.*You can receive material and information from the coach
Telephone Calls*You can call the coach at your own expense. **After June 15th coaches can call, text, and email you unlimited.*You can call the coach at your own expense. **College coach can call, text, and email you unlimited.*You can call the coach at your own expense. **College coach can call, text, and email you unlimited.
Off-Campus Contact*After June 15 of your Sophomore year, these contacts are unlimited.*Unlimited*Unlimited
Official Visits*Not Permitted*Not Permitted*You can start official visits on the opening day of your classes. **You get one per college and a maximum of 5 visits to D1, and unlimited visits to D2, D3 and NAIA schools.
Unofficial Visits*Unlimited*Unlimited*Unlimited

D2 Baseball Calendar

11-10-14 thru 11-12-14 Dead Period
04-13-15 thru 04-13-14 Dead Period

D3 Baseball

Recruiting TacticAs a SophomoreAs a JuniorAs a Senior
Recruiting Material*You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires. **You can receive recruiting information and material from college coaches.*You can receive recruiting material and information from the coach.*You can receive material and information from the coach
Telephone Calls*You can call the coach at your own expense. **College coach can call you an unlimited number of times.*You can call the coach at your own expense. **College coach can call you an unlimited number of times.*You can call the coach at your own expense. **College coaches can call you an unlimited number of times.
Off-Campus Contact*Not Permitted*Allowed after your Junior Year.*Allowed
Official Visits*Not Permitted*Not Permitted*You can start official visits on the opening day of your classes. **You get one per college.
Unofficial Visits*Unlimited*Unlimited*Unlimited

NCAA Clearinghouse

The NCAA department that used to be called the clearinghouse is now known as the eligibility center. The eligibility center is the organization that determines if you are academically eligible to play college athletics. In high school there are a certain number of core courses required and minimum GPA and ACT/SAT scores you need to earn. You only need to register with the eligibility center if you plan on playing at the NCAA Division 1, 1-A or 2 levels. To register go to the

http://web1.ncaa.org/ECWR2/NCAA_EMS/NCAA.jsp

NAIA has their own clearinghouse and you must register:

http:// www.naia.org/ViewArticle.dbml?ATCLID=205327424

Glossary of Terms

Contact:A contact is classified as a face-to-face encounter between a college coach and the student athlete (or their legal guardians or relatives) where more than a greeting occurs. Anything beyond a hello is considered a contact. Another form of contact occurs when a college coach has any contact with you or your legal guardians at your high school, or any other location where you are competing or practicing.

Contact Period: College coaches are allowed to have in-person contact with you or your legal guardians. This period means coaches can watch you compete anywhere, and the coach can write and make telephone calls.

Dead Period: The college coach cannot make in-person contact with you or your legal guardians. This prevents the coach from making any evaluations of you whatsoever. However, the coach can make telephone calls to you or your legal guardians.

Evaluation: This is the process where a coach watches you compete in a game or practice, and makes note on your athletic abilities.

Evaluation Period: It is permissible for the college coach to evaluate your playing abilities at your high school or any other place where you are competing. During this period the coach cannot have off campus in-person contact with you or your legal guardians. The coach can still make telephone calls to you or your legal guardians, and you are allowed to make campus visits during this period.

Official Visit: Any visit to a college that is paid for by that university. You and/or your legal guardians will have your transportation to and from the college paid for. Also paid for by the college will be your room, meals (three per day), and entertainment expenses. Generally you will receive three free passes to that college’s home game the weekend you are in town.

Quiet Period: During this time a college coach cannot watch you compete at any location. It is allowed for the college coach to make in-person contact with you or your legal guardians if it occurs on the coach’s campus. The coach can still make telephone calls to you or your legal guardians, and you can make visits to college campuses during this time.

Telephone Call: An electronically transmitted voice exchange is considered a phone call. That includes videoconferencing and videophones. Emails and faxes are not considered a phone call.

Unofficial Visit: Anytime you or your legal guardians visit a college campus that is funded by you. You can take as many unofficial visits as you would like. During dead periods you cannot speak to any of the coaches while visiting the campus. Three free tickets to a home game is the only thing a coach can give you during an unofficial visit.

NLI – National Letter Of Intent: An NLI or national letter of intent is the written commitment that you give a school your senior year stating that you will attend that school the following year and accept their offer for athletic financial aide (athletic scholarship). You only have to sign an NLI if you are receiving some sort of athletic scholarship from the school. There are only certain dates when you can sign your NLI and this is different for each sport. Once you have signed an NLI you are committed to that school for an entire year and can no longer be recruited by any other schools.

Scholarship stats – http://www.scholarshipstats.com/baseball.html

Where you fit in… Just a guideline – there are exceptions to every

rule and depending on your age colleges will project growth and maturity

TIER 1 – D1; High D2; High JUCO

TIER 2 – D2, High NAIA, High D3, Competitive JUCO

TIER 3 – Lower D2; Mid NAIA, Mid D3, Lower JUCO

TIER 4 – Low NAIA; Low D3; Low JUCO

Tier 1 Catcher

Physical Measurables: Height: 6’1” Weight: 200 lbs.

Stats: OB %:.500 Slugging: .600 (Minimum 2 AB’s per game)

  • Pop Time: 1.95 and below consistently (Verified by a neutral source)

Notes:

Division I catching recruits are evaluated on several levels, most importantly, college coaches will look at the defensive and leadership skills that the catcher possesses. anywhere between 5’10’’ and 6’4” and weigh between 185 and 220 pounds. While pop time is important, coaches will take a closer look at the catch and throw mechanics the catcher possesses as well as the arm strength shown while throwing to 2nd and 3rd base. While defense comes first for a catcher, Division I coaches will also look for a player that demonstrates outstanding leadership skills and has the ability to work with an entire pitching staff. Another important factor in evaluating a Division I catcher is hitting. Division I recruits at the catching position swing the bat well. Catchers are usually guys that can hit for power or average at a high level.

Tier 2 Catcher

Physical Measurables: Height: 6’0” Weight: 180 lbs.

Stats: OB%: .450 Slugging: .550 (Minimum 2 AB’s per game)

  • Pop Time: 2.0 and below consistently (Verified by a neutral source)

Notes:

Catchers in this tier are usually polished in at least one phase of the game and show the ability to improve in all other areas of the game. Whether it is defensively or offensively, a solid Division II catching prospect demonstrates the ability to excel at the plate as a

Tier 3 Catcher

Physical Measurables: Height: 5’11 Weight: 180 lbs.

Stats: OB%: . 400 Slugging: .500 Pop time: 2.0 – 2.1

Notes:

Catchers at this level posses leadership skills. Size is important, along with the abilities to block, receive, handle a pitching staff, and catch/throw.

Tier 4 Catcher

Physical Measurables: Height: 5’10”, Weight: 170 lbs.

Stats: OB %: .350 Slugging: .450 Pop Time: 2.1 or below !

Tier 1 Centerfield

Physical Measurables:

  • A 60 yard dash below 6.7 is the norm for a high level Division I centerfield recruit.
  • Also, they should register anywhere between 87 and 95+ MPH from the outfield on the radar gun.

Stats: OB %: .500 Slugging: .600 (Minimum 2 AB’s per game)

Notes:

The typical Division I centerfielder is very, very fast. Division I centerfield recruits must also possess a strong arm. The Division I centerfield recruit must also be a leader, so communication with other outfielders and middle infielders will be key. In terms of hitting, the Division I centerfield recruit is viewed more often than not as a top of the order type of hitter, with the occasional outlier being a centerfielder that hits for power and fits in better in the middle of the lineup. The ability to get on base, steal bases, and score from first on extra base hits will be important for Division I centerfield recruits. Size is not as important for centerfielders, but a prototypical Division I centerfield recruit is generally between 5’9’’ and 6’2’’ while weighing between 175 and 210 pounds.

Tier 2 Centerfield

Physical Measurables:

  • A 60 yard dash anywhere below 6.9 is desired for Division II recruits.

Stats: OB: .450 SLG: .500 (Minimum 2 AB’s per game)

Notes:

Division II centerfielder’s will be expected to field their position exceptionally well. Similar to a MIF, defense is almost always the first priority for a Division II centerfielder. After defense, college coaches at the Division II level will look for centerfielders that can swing the bat well and hit at the top or the bottom of the lineup. A Division II centerfielder usually excels in one area of the game and shows the potential to develop in other areas.

Tier 3 Centerfield

Physical Measurables: Height: 5’11” Weight: 180 lbs.

  • 60 Yard Dash: 6.9 or below
  • Velocity from the OF of 80+ MPH

Stats: OB% .400 Slugging: .500

Notes:Speed, range, getting on-base, and stealing bases are all qualities centerfielders at this level will possess. A power hitting centerfielder is a bonus, but might sacrifice some speed aspects of the game. Coaches will look for centerfielders who can cover ground and be a leader in the outfield.

Tier 4 Centerfield

Physical Measurables: Height: 5’10”; Weight: 170 lbs.

  • 60 Yard Dash: 7.0 or below
  • Velocity from the OF: 78+ MPH Stats: OB %: .350 Slugging: .450

Notes:

Centerfielders in this tier still need to have speed, be able to cover a lot of ground in the outfield, and get on base, but may just not be fast enough to play at a high level or be raw offensively. Arm strength may lack as well.

Tier 1 Corner Outfielder

Physical Measurables:

  • A 60 yard dash anywhere below 6.8 is desired at the Division I level for corner outfielders.
  • Velocity from the OF: 87+ MPH (Verified by a neutral source)

Stats: The Division I corner outfielder that hits for power will generally hit at least 5 HRs

  • OB %: .500 Slugging: .750 (Minimum 2 AB’s per game)

Notes:

Division I corner outfield recruits are usually outstanding hitters. Some corner outfield recruits will hit for power, others will hit for average and steal a lot of bases. Qualities in a hitter’s swing that Division I coaches will look for are: bat speed, a short, compact stroke, and balance with the ability to hit all kinds of pitches. The ability to hit the ball to all fields is also important for a Division I hitter. If a Division I corner outfielder does not hit for power, then he must hit for a high average and run very well.

Tier 2 Corner Outfielder

Physical Measurables:

  • A 60 yard dash anywhere below 7.0 is desired at the Division II level for corner outfielders.
  • Velocity from the OF: low 80s at least, with the potential to improve.

Stats:

  • Power hitter: Multiple HRs as a Junior and Senior in HS.
  • Average/on-baseball hitter: A lot of SBs and a high OBP in HS

Notes:

Division II corner outfielders must excel in at least one phase of the game, whether it be hitting for power, hitting for average, or fielding his position at a high level. Most coaches in this tier will look for a corner outfielder that hits well, but may need to improve defensively.

Tier 3 Corner Outfielder

Physical Measurables: Height: 5’11″; Weight: 180 lbs.

  • 60 Yard Dash: 6.9 or below
  • Power hitter: Multiple HRs as a Junior and Senior in HS.
  • Average/on-base hitter: A lot of SBs and a high OBP in HS.
  • Velocity from the OF: 80+ MPH Stats: OB%: .400 Slugging: .650

Notes:

Corner outfielders at this level will posses one or two of the qualities of D1 corner outfielders. Power hitting corner outfielders may not have speed. Speed corner outfielders may lack a strong arm. The qualities are important parts to the baseball program and can have big impacts on the team.

Tier 4 Corner Outfielder

Physical Measurables: Height: 5’10”;Weight: 170 lbs.

  • 60 Yard Dash: 7.0 or below
  • Velocity from the OF: 78+ MPH Stats: OB %: .350 Slugging: .600

Notes:

Lower level corner outfielders may hit for power but not consistently. They may hit for a high average and have good speed, but not have the experience at these positions or against good competition.

Tier 1 First Baseman

Physical Measurables: Height: Between 6’2’’ and 6’6’’; Weight between 190 and 240 pounds

Stats: First basemen interested in playing at the Division I level generally hit 5-10 homeruns as a Junior and Senior in high school

  • OB %: .500 Slugging: .750 (Minimum 2 AB’s per game)

Notes:

Division I first basemen are generally very developed physically before getting to college. The biggest factor in evaluating a Division I first baseman is the ability to hit for power and drive runs in. Coaches evaluating a hitting skills video of a first baseman will look for a short, compact swing, quick bat speed, and a load or hitting mechanism that generates a lot of power. Fielding ability is not as important for a first baseman, as long as he can make the routine play on a regular basis.

Tier 2 First Baseman

Physical Measurables: Height: At least 6’0”; Weight: At least 180 lbs.

Stats:

  • Need to demonstrate the ability or potential to hit for power.
  • A solid 1B recruit in this tier should have a few HRs and a lot of RBIs as a Junior and Senior in HS.

Notes: The most important factor in recruiting for 1B is the ability to hit for power or for a high average. While a 1B recruit in this tier may not be as polished, he should definitely show the potential to hit for power at some point in the near future.

Tier 3 First Baseman

Physical Measurables: Height: 6’0″; Weight: 180 lbs. Stats: Power Numbers: 3+ HR, 25+ RBI

Notes:

First basemen at this level will posses some qualities, but not all of high level athletes at this position. Regardless, this is an offensive position at this level.

Tier 4 First Baseman

Physical Measurables: Height: 5’11” Weight: 170 lbs. Stats:

Power Numbers: 2+ HR, 20+RBI

Notes:

Like many positions, size is lacking for players in this tier. If they do have good size, athleticism may be missing or power. It is very important for college level first baseman to hit for power and drive in runs. This may be projectable for players who end up at this level.

Tier 1 Middle Infielder:

Physical Measurables:

A Division I middle infield recruit will generally run between a 6.5 and a 6.8 60 yard dash. This time needs to be verified by a 3rd party for college coaches to truly believe it.

In terms of arm strength, Division I middle infield recruits will throw the ball across the diamond anywhere between 85 MPH and 95 MPH.

Stats – OB %: .500; Slugging: .600 (Minimum 2 AB’s per game)

Notes:

Division I middle infielders are evaluated first from a defensive standpoint, and then from an hitting standpoint. The most important factors when evaluating a Division I middle infielder defensively are speed, quickness, good hands, and arm strength. Coaches at the Division I level will look for middle infielders that display outstanding defensive ability in all of these categories. While having a fast 60 time is important, college coaches will also look for an agile middle infielder that can cover a lot of ground laterally, this is often referred to as range. Having great range allows the middle infielder to field ground balls that may deep in the hole or up the middle. Division I middle infielders will also be able to hit at a high level. The prototypical Division I middle infield recruit can hit for a high average as well as steal a lot of bases and occasionally hit for power.

Tier 2 Middle Infielder

Physical Measurables:

Prototypical Division II MIFs stand anywhere between 5’8” and 6’2” Weight is between 165 and 190 lbs.
60 Yard Dash: 6.9 or below.
Infield Velocity: Low 80s and above from SS.

Stats: OB%: .550; Slugging: .450 (Minimum 2 AB’s per game)

Notes:

Division II MIFs must be polished in at least one phase of the game (fielding or hitting), but more often than not they are more of an asset defensively and have things to work on from a hitting standpoint. Speed is still a quality that coaches will look for at this

Tier 3 Middle Infielder

Physical Measurables: Height: 5’11″; Weight: 170 lbs.

60 Yard Dash: 7.0 or below

Velocity from the INF: 78+ MPH from SS Stats: OB%: .400 Slugging: .500

Notes:

Athleticism, knowledge of the game, and leadership skills are necessary for shortstops at this level. Defensive skills are the focus for shortstops, with offensive skills being a bonus. Shortstops at this level will be missing a few elements of the D1 shortstop, but they still make plays and contribute in the line-up.

Tier 4 Middle Infielder

Physical Measurables:

Height: 5’10”; Weight: 165 lbs.

60 Yard Dash: 7.1 or below

Velocity from the INF: Upper 70’s MPH from SS Stats: OB %: .350 Slugging: .450

Notes:

A good shortstop is always in need for a college coach and this tier is no different. This should be the best athlete on the field, but these shortstops aren’t playing at higher levels because of a lack of speed and lateral quickness. They make the plays, but don’t have the best range. A batting average may be sacrificed for a great leader in the field.

Tier 1 Third Basemen
Physical Measurables: The typical Division I third base recruit stands anywhere between 5’10’’

and 6’3’’

Weight is between 180 and 220 pounds

Stats:

Division I third base recruits generally throw the ball across the diamond anywhere between 85 and 95 MPH.

Third basemen interested in playing at the Division I level generally hit 5-10 homeruns as a Junior and Senior in high school.

OB %: .500 Slugging: .750

Notes:

Division I recruits at third base must possess a mixture of skills both defensively and offensively. Important factors on a defensive basis are arm strength and footwork. While

Division I third basemen do not have to be particularly fast, they do have to show the ability to move side to side quickly in order to cover a lot of ground at third base. Being able to field the ball and also being able to throw the ball at a high velocity can give the recruit a chance to play at the Division I level. From and offensive standpoint, third basemen must show the ability to hit for power and average. Division I third base recruits are often times looked at as power hitters in the middle of the lineup.

Tier 2 Third Basemen

Physical Measurables:

The typical Division II (Tier 2) 3B stands anywhere between 5’9″ and 6’3”

Weight is between 170 and 220 pounds.

Stats:

Notes:

Division II 3B must be polished in at least one phase of the game and possess the potential to develop in all other areas. 3B in this tier must swing the bat and field their position adequately in high school in order to play at this level in college. 3B at this level must also be able to run adequately, anywhere below a 7.5 60 time will suffice.

Tier 3 Third Basemen

Physical Measurables: Height: 6’0, Weight: 180 lbs.

Stats: Power Numbers: 2+ HR, 25+ RBI Notes:

Third basemen at this level will posses some qualities, but not all of high level athletes at this position. Regardless, this is a position requiring a mix of defensive and offensive talents.

Tier 4 Third Basemen

Physical Measurables:Height: 5’11”, Weight: 170 lbs. Stats: Power Numbers: 2+ HR, 20+RBI

Notes:

Lower level third base recruits should still have a strong arm and be able to hit for power, but may only flash these abilities versus do it consistently. The same goes for quick reflexes in the field.

Infield Velocity: At least 80 MPH with the ability to improve through development. HR: At least 2 HR as a Junior and Senior.
OBP/SLG: At least .400 in each category.

Physical Measurables:

Tier 1 Pitcher:

As low at 84 MPH consistently and ranging to 95+

2 Additional pitches thrown to spots consistently
Stats: ERA below 2.00 At least 1 K per IP Walk less than 1 batter per 2 IP Notes:

The first thing a Division I coach will look for when evaluating a pitcher is fastball velocity. Prototypical Division I pitching recruits throw anywhere between 87 and 95 MPH on a consistent basis. It is important to remember that coaches are looking for pitchers to consistently throw at this velocity, not just touch it every once and a while. While velocity is very important in evaluation, for a Division I pitcher, command and control are also factors that determine if a recruit can play at this level. Division I pitchers must also display command of at least 3 pitches. Having a great fastball will only get a Division I pitcher so far, having a repertoire of three or four pitches gives the pitcher the ability to keep hitters off balance. Pitch movement will also be important for pitchers with aspirations to play at the Division I level. Throwing a fastball at 87 MPH with a lot of movement can often times be more effective than throwing a straight fastball at 90 MPH. In terms of statistics, Division I pitching recruits have an ERA below 2.00, average at least one strikeout per inning, and walk less than one or less batters every two innings. On average, they have the ability to throw many innings, and most often they are only used on the mound and rarely as position players.

Tier 2 Pitcher

Physical Measurables:

As low as 82 MPH consistently and ranging to 90+

1 additional pitch thrown to spots consistently
Stats: ERA below 3.00 Around 1 K per IP Walk around 1 batter per 2 IP Notes:

While pitchers in this tier may not be as polished as a D-I recruit, they definitely show the capability to pitch at a high level down the road. Pitchers in this category usually throw anywhere from the low 80s to high 80s in high school, and have the potential to gain more velocity down the road. Pitchers in this category will also have secondary pitches that can become “out pitches” with continued development and practice.

Tier 3 Pitcher

Physical Measurables:

Pitchers in this tier typically throw velocities of 77 MPH – 82 MPH

These pitchers will have control of at least one off-speed pitch and be developing another.

Stats: ERA between 2.50-3.50 Strike out to walk ratio of 1:1 Notes:

While pitchers in this tier are still developing arm strength and off-speed pitches, they can still control at least their fastball and one off-speed pitch. Movement on the fastball and off-speed pitches along with the ability to locate these pitches will be important

Tier 4 Pitcher

Physical Measurables:

Velocities for recruits in this tier really varies, but recruits usually have success with a fastball and are working on a secondary pitch or are more of a “junk pitcher” in high school

Stats: 1 or less than 1 K per Inning Pitched ERA below 4.00

Notes:

Pitchers at this level still have development left to go. They may have not had the highest level of success on the mound in high school, but have a strong desire and work ethic to continue to improve. Pitching is always in need at any level and this tier is no

Academic Requirements for College Athletes

NCAA D1 Eligibility Requirements

The following requirements are for all athletes who want to play NCAA D1 sports and receive an athletic scholarship. 99% of athletes who meet the DI requirements will also be eligible at other division levels. It is important to remember that just because you meet the academic requirements of the NCAA, you are not guaranteed to gain admission into the school of your choice. Here are the NCAA D1 requirements for athlete graduating in the class of 2013, 2014 or 2015.

  1. You must graduate from high school
  2. You must complete 16 core courses and receive a minimum GPA of 2.0 in those courses. The core course requirements are as follows 4 years of English, 3 years of Math (Algebra 1 or higher), 2 years of Natural or Physical Science, 2 years of Social Science, 1 extra year of English, Math or Science and 4 years of Religion, Philosophy, Foreign Language or additional years of any of the categories above.
  3. You must take the SAT or ACT and score a minimum of 400 on the SAT (Math and Reading only) or 37 on the ACT (your sum score). GPA Calculator.
  4. Your core course GPA combined with your SAT/ACT score must meet the minimum requirements as laid out by the NCAA Sliding Scale (please go to the bottom of this page to see the complete sliding scale).

New NCAA D1 Requirements for Athletes Graduating in 2016 or Later

The academic requirements for student athletes graduating in 2016 or later are going to be much higher than the current academic markers. If current high school athletes were required to meet the new academic standards, over 15% of incoming freshman would not be eligible (40% of basketball players and 35% of football players). This means if you are following the same courses as the athletes ahead of you, there is a chance you will not be eligible. Here is a summary of all of the new requirements.

The new minimum GPA goes up from 2.0 to 2.3

The GPA requirements on the sliding scale have gone up roughly .5. See the sliding scale for 2016 graduates at the bottom of this page.

You must complete 10 of your 16 core course before your senior year of high school

You will not be allowed to retake any of your 10 core courses before your senior year for a higher score.

  • NCAA DII Eligibility Requirements

The requirements to play NCAA D2 sports and receive a scholarship are lower than the DI level. All eligible DI athletes are eligible at the DII level. If you don’t meet the DI requirements but meet the requirements below, you can compete at the NCAA DII level.

  1. You must graduate from high school
  2. You must complete 16 core courses and receive a minimum GPA of 2.0. The core course requirements are as follows 3 years of English, 3 years of Math (Algebra 1 or higher), 2 years of Natural or Physical Science, 2 years of Social Science, 2 extra years of English, Math or Science and 4 years of Religion, Philosophy, Foreign Language or additional years of any of the categories above.
  3. You must take the SAT or ACT. You need to score a minimum of 820 on the SAT (Math and Reading only) or an ACT sum score of 68.

NCAA DIII Eligibility Requirements

If you are going to compete at the NCAA DIII level you do not need to register with the NCAA. The NCAA has no academic requirements for DIII athletes. Each university sets their own academic standards for student athletes and financial aid. It is best to contact the coaches at the DIII universities you are interested and get the standards from them.

NAIA Eligibility Requirements

The academic standards for the NAIA are the lowest of all division levels except Junior Colleges. In order to be eligible athletes must graduate from high school and meet 2 of the following 3 requirements:

1. Finish in the top half of your graduating class 2. Achieve a minimum GPA of 2.0
3. Score860ontheSATor16ontheACT

The academic requirements are only one set of the requirements needed to meet the eligibility standards to play college sports and receive a scholarship.

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